Articles from Politifact

Social Security: A critical program with an uncertain future

Make no mistake about it, Social Security is deeply intertwined with the fabric of America’s well-being. Its checks to retirees and the disabled, plus their families, help over 63 million people pay the bills. Without it, about a third of elderly Americans would live in poverty, and nearly 25 million count on it for at least half their income. But the $1 trillion-a-year program faces some daunting math. As more people retire, there are fewer workers paying in to cover the cost of the money going out.

What is the pay gap between men and women?

The disparity in how much women make compared with men comes up often in the political discourse, tagged with a call to action to help women’s paychecks catch up. Several leading Democratic presidential candidates recently highlighted one of the biggest imbalances — saying that a Latina woman must work 23 months to make the amount a white man makes in one year, or that they make 54 cents on the dollar. See Figure 1 on PolitiFact.com PolitiFact has been fact-checking claims about women’s pay for years.

Warren vs. Buttigieg: Why they were fighting about campaign finance and a wine cave at the debate

Pete Buttigieg and Sen. Elizabeth Warren dueled over campaign finance during the December Democratic presidential primary debate, presenting two contrasting visions for campaign fundraising. Warren attacked Buttigieg for a “wine cave” approach to 2020 fundraising as she touted her decision not to hold fundraisers with big-dollar donors and lobbyists. She has said that such practices encourage a political system awash in special-interest influence. Instead, Warren said she would fund her campaign through “small-dollar” donations, often made online, by rank-and-file Americans.

What’s next after Trump’s impeachment?

The U.S. House of Representatives passed two articles of impeachment on near-party-line votes, making Donald Trump the third impeached president in U.S. history. Here’s what to expect in the weeks ahead. What's next? The next step in the impeachment process is a trial in the Senate. But House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., told reporters shortly after the Dec. 18 vote that she was not yet ready to “transmit” the articles of impeachment to the Senate. Pelosi said she wanted to ensure that the Senate would hold a fair trial.

Trump repeats many falsehoods in letter to Pelosi about impeachment

On the eve of the House’s expected vote on impeachment, President Donald Trump wrote a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in which he called the accusations against him “disingenuous, meritless, and baseless invention of your imagination.” Trump accused the Democrats of suffering from “Trump Derangement Syndrome” after losing the election in 2016 and said they are trying to steal the election in 2020. The letter included specific attacks on the overall impeachment process, U.S. Rep.

10 things Donald Trump got wrong about impeachment in 2019, fact-checked

President Donald Trump has deployed an array of claims to undercut the substance, process and key figures of the Democratic-driven impeachment investigation. Many were wrong. PolitiFact named one our 2019 Lie of the Year. Here are 10 other significant ones we heard and fact-checked in 2019. RELATED: Trump’s claim that whistleblower got his Ukraine call ‘almost completely wrong’ is the 2019 Lie of the Year 1. “What is taking place is not an impeachment, it is a COUP.” Pants on Fire.

A look back at Lie of the Year, 2009 to 2018

PolitiFact awards the Lie of the Year to the most significant falsehood or exaggeration of the past 12 months. Here’s a look back at the past 10 years of “winners.” 2018: Online smear machine tries to take down Parkland students After 17 people were viciously gunned down at a Florida high school, lies about the students started when they advocated for action against gun violence. Students were called “crisis actors” and worse. During a time of little bipartisanship, the attacks on the Parkland students set off a shared outrage in nearly all political corners.

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