Articles from Politifact

Veterans Choice: How we reported this story

Return to main story on fees paid to private contractors in the Veterans Choice program. Since 2014, Congress has pumped $19.4 billion into the Veterans Choice Program to buy private medical care for veterans. We wanted to know how the money was spent. As of Sept. 30, 2018, the program’s expenditures totaled about $12.6 billion, according to a running tally provided to Congress every two weeks. An additional $2.4 billion has been committed but not yet spent, and there was $4.3 billion left over, according to the most recent report.

Veterans Choice: How we reported this story

Return to main story on fees paid to private contractors in the Veterans Choice program. Since 2014, Congress has pumped $19.4 billion into the Veterans Choice Program to buy private medical care for veterans. We wanted to know how the money was spent. As of Sept. 30, 2018, the program’s expenditures totaled about $12.6 billion, according to a running tally provided to Congress every two weeks. An additional $2.4 billion has been committed but not yet spent, and there was $4.3 billion left over, according to the most recent report.

Donald Trump says tariffs will make America rich again. Economists disagree

For years before he became president, Donald Trump has been intrigued by the idea of tariffs. In his 2011 book, Time to Get Tough, for instance, he proposed a 20 percent tax on imported goods. In his presidential announcement speech, Trump proposed 35 percent tariffs on Ford cars produced in Mexican factories. In an interview with the New York Times editorial board, Trump said he would support a 45 percent tariff on Chinese exports to the United States. And in a Republican debate, his then-presidential rival Ted Cruz brought up his past comments on trade.

Donald Trump says tariffs will make America rich again. Economists disagree

For years before he became president, Donald Trump has been intrigued by the idea of tariffs. In his 2011 book, Time to Get Tough, for instance, he proposed a 20 percent tax on imported goods. In his presidential announcement speech, Trump proposed 35 percent tariffs on Ford cars produced in Mexican factories. In an interview with the New York Times editorial board, Trump said he would support a 45 percent tariff on Chinese exports to the United States. And in a Republican debate, his then-presidential rival Ted Cruz brought up his past comments on trade.

How much is the Mueller investigation costing? (updated)

President Donald Trump has periodically taken shots at the cost of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of Russia’s impact on the 2016 presidential election. A new document released by the Justice Department details just how much it has cost – and it isn’t as high as the $40 million that Trump has alleged. Here’s a rundown. Looking at direct costs only The Mueller investigation is being funded through mandatory spending, which essentially means it is set up to be free of executive branch influence.

How much is the Mueller investigation costing? (updated)

President Donald Trump has periodically taken shots at the cost of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of Russia’s impact on the 2016 presidential election. A new document released by the Justice Department details just how much it has cost – and it isn’t as high as the $40 million that Trump has alleged. Here’s a rundown. Looking at direct costs only The Mueller investigation is being funded through mandatory spending, which essentially means it is set up to be free of executive branch influence.

PolitiFact’s 2018 Lie of the Year coverage

Here are links and summaries of our 2018 Lie of the Year coverage. The 2018 Lie of the Year: Online smear machine tries to take down Parkland students. Read our special report on how attacks after the Florida school shooting were the most significant falsehoods of the year. We documented how attacks on the Parkland students set off a shared outrage in nearly all political corners. Lie of the Year Readers’ Poll results. Every year, our readers pick their most significant fact-check out of a list of finalists.

PolitiFact’s 2018 Lie of the Year coverage

Here are links and summaries of our 2018 Lie of the Year coverage. The 2018 Lie of the Year: Online smear machine tries to take down Parkland students. Read our special report on how attacks after the Florida school shooting were the most significant falsehoods of the year. We documented how attacks on the Parkland students set off a shared outrage in nearly all political corners. Lie of the Year Readers’ Poll results. Every year, our readers pick their most significant fact-check out of a list of finalists.

Why PolitiFact doesn’t use the word ‘lie’ — except once a year

Editor's note: PolitiFact Editor Angie Drobnic Holan wrote this column for the media news website Poynter.org. You might expect a website that fact-checks American politics to use the word “lie” a lot. But at PolitiFact, we don’t. We use the word lie once a year, when we consider a year’s worth of fact-checking and pick one falsehood that we consider the most egregious. We call it the Lie of the Year, and we’ve named one every December since 2009. This year’s Lie of the Year was the online smears against the Parkland students. The rest of the time we avoid the word lie.

Why PolitiFact doesn’t use the word ‘lie’ — except once a year

Editor's note: PolitiFact Editor Angie Drobnic Holan wrote this column for the media news website Poynter.org. You might expect a website that fact-checks American politics to use the word “lie” a lot. But at PolitiFact, we don’t. We use the word lie once a year, when we consider a year’s worth of fact-checking and pick one falsehood that we consider the most egregious. We call it the Lie of the Year, and we’ve named one every December since 2009. This year’s Lie of the Year was the online smears against the Parkland students. The rest of the time we avoid the word lie.

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